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Brochure Binding Explained
2 Apr 2019
 

Brochure Binding Explained

 

Brochure Binding Explained

2 Apr 2019
brochure-binding-explained

A binding is more than a fastener that holds a document together. The right binding gives your document shape, improves durability and makes it easier for readers to use.

But choosing the right binding for your document can sometimes be confusing, plus there is more to think about than just the aesthetics.

To help you along here’s a quick run down of the top 3 most popular brochure binding types…

 

Infographic explaining brochure binding types

Staple Bound

Also known as ‘stitched’ or ‘saddle stitched’, staple binding is one of the most popular and affordable binding options.

How its done

First, the pages are printed on to sheets in ‘printers pairs’.

They are then stacked in order and shuffled neatly in to place.

Next, the pages are partially folded and small holes are punched along the fold line.

Finally the wires are fed through the holes from the outside of the spine and are folded flat on the inside centre spread to grip all the pages – just like a stapler!

Perfect for

A stapled binding works for most types of printed brochures with a relatively low page count, such as:

 

Why choose it?

Staple binding is the best value for money when it comes to brochure binding, so if cost is a concern when ordering consider choosing this option. It is cheap and easy to produce so is perfect for publications on a small budget.

If you are faced with a tight deadline staple binding is great because it is such a fast process. Your brochures can often be printed and delivered to you the next day with this type of binding.

The simple, low cost process of this binding option also means there is no minimum quantity when ordering so it is perfect for short and long production runs.

Things to remember

There are a few things you need to remember when choosing a staple binding for your brochure:

  1. The page count must be in multiples of 4
    This is because the page spreads are printed on 1 sheet of paper which is folded in half – meaning each full printed page will have 4 individual pages.
  2. The maximum number of pages should be around 52
    If the page count goes beyond this the booklet will be incline to spring open and will not lie flat when opened, as the staples will have a hard time accommodating for so many pages.
  3. Allow a minimum of 5mm blank space from the spine
    As with all printed brochures, it is important that a minimum of 5mm of blank space is given when the spine will be. This blank space (safety area) will ensure that no important text or images are lost into the center of the booklet when the pages are opened.

 

Wire Bound

Most popular for lots of different types of office based documents, wire binding can sometimes also be referred to as wire-o, wiro or wire comb binding.

How its done

Printed pages are stacked in order and the shuffled into place.

All of the pages are then hole punched down one side.

Finally, the open wire comb is threaded through the holes and clamped closed around the stack of paper – easy!

Perfect for

Wire binding is the most obvious choice for documents which require multiple use such as:

  • Notebooks
  • Calendars
  • Diaries

 

Why choose it?

The ‘o’ shaped binding allows the reader of the brochure to lay their book fully flat and even fold it completely in half – providing easy reference whilst taking up minimal space.

It is also the most durable binding option which allows for heavy use with virtually no wear and tear and can even allow for a page to be torn out without any effect on the surrounding pages.

Speaking of pages, brochures with wire-o binding can include an odd number of pages as each page is printed individually.

It is also easy to stay on brand and stand out with this stylish binding type as you can choose a wire colour to compliment your brochure’s colour scheme.

Things to remember

  1. Add a thicker cover for even more durability
    A thicker cover, around 250gsm or higher will make your brochure really sturdy and add even more durability.
  2. Works best with more than 20 pages
    Wiro binding works much better for brochures that have a substantial amount of pages, usually around 20 or more. However, you can certainly wire bind booklets with a smaller amount of pages if required.
  3. Allow 10mm of blank space from the spine
    All printed brochures require some blank space around the spine, but wire-o brochures require a little more than usual due to the thickness of the binding. Always allow around 10mm of blank space (safety zone) from the spine to avoid important text or images being covered with the binding.

 

Perfect Bound

Sometimes known as adhesive or softcover bound – perfect binding is the most sleek and stylish binding option.

How its done

Folded inner pages (signatures) are stacked on top of each other neatly and their spines are ruffed or notched.

Hot glue is then applied along the folds. The notching along the folds allows the glue to penetrate and absorb much easier, which means the binding will last longer.

The cover (both front and back) are printed on a single sheet with a 5mm spine in the middle. This is wrapped around all of the folded inner pages and the glued folded edges are pressed into the spine.

Perfect for

Perfect binding is most suited to professional publications, especially those with multiple issues or brochures with lots of content such as:

  • Magazines
  • Catalogues
  • Soft cover books

 

Why choose it?

Perfect bound brochures look very professional and luxurious which is why they are the most popular choice for most magazines.

The ability to include text on the spine is also a great feature for a publication such as a magazine or soft-cover books as it allows for easy reference when stacked and stored – making it easy to find a particular issue or title when scanning across the spines.

The way the binding is created also means that it can be used with a very high amount of pages, the spine size simply just increases in width as the number of pages increases.

Things to remember

  1. The page count must be in multiples of 4
    This is because the page spreads are printed on 1 sheet of paper which is folded in half – meaning each full printed page will have 4 individual pages.
  2. Page count must be around 40 pages or higher
    The inner pages have to provide enough surface area for the glue to bind the pages to cover spine area. A low number of pages cannot accommodate enough glue to hold the pages to the inner spine – so a higher page count will always work best.
  3. Allow a minimum of 5mm blank space from the spine
    As with all printed brochures, it is important that a minimum of 5mm of blank space is given when the spine will be. This blank space (safety area) will ensure that no important text or images are lost into the spine or the brochure when the pages are opened. If your brochure has a high amount of pages, allowing more blank space will be required.

 

This should give you everything you need to know to help choose the right binding for your next printed brochure. If you need are more help choosing, or would like a quote please feel free to call our team on 01952 850 730 or email us on sales@print-print.co.uk

Download this infographic.

Embed Our Infographic On Your Site!





Get a feel for what we do!

Our FREE sample packs are full of great print ideas. They’ll give you a taste of what to expect when ordering your design and printing from us.

Request free sample pack

 

brochure-binding-explained

A binding is more than a fastener that holds a document together. The right binding gives your document shape, improves durability and makes it easier for readers to use.

But choosing the right binding for your document can sometimes be confusing, plus there is more to think about than just the aesthetics.

To help you along here’s a quick run down of the top 3 most popular brochure binding types…

 

Infographic explaining brochure binding types

Staple Bound

Also known as ‘stitched’ or ‘saddle stitched’, staple binding is one of the most popular and affordable binding options.

How its done

First, the pages are printed on to sheets in ‘printers pairs’.

They are then stacked in order and shuffled neatly in to place.

Next, the pages are partially folded and small holes are punched along the fold line.

Finally the wires are fed through the holes from the outside of the spine and are folded flat on the inside centre spread to grip all the pages – just like a stapler!

Perfect for

A stapled binding works for most types of printed brochures with a relatively low page count, such as:

 

Why choose it?

Staple binding is the best value for money when it comes to brochure binding, so if cost is a concern when ordering consider choosing this option. It is cheap and easy to produce so is perfect for publications on a small budget.

If you are faced with a tight deadline staple binding is great because it is such a fast process. Your brochures can often be printed and delivered to you the next day with this type of binding.

The simple, low cost process of this binding option also means there is no minimum quantity when ordering so it is perfect for short and long production runs.

Things to remember

There are a few things you need to remember when choosing a staple binding for your brochure:

  1. The page count must be in multiples of 4
    This is because the page spreads are printed on 1 sheet of paper which is folded in half – meaning each full printed page will have 4 individual pages.
  2. The maximum number of pages should be around 52
    If the page count goes beyond this the booklet will be incline to spring open and will not lie flat when opened, as the staples will have a hard time accommodating for so many pages.
  3. Allow a minimum of 5mm blank space from the spine
    As with all printed brochures, it is important that a minimum of 5mm of blank space is given when the spine will be. This blank space (safety area) will ensure that no important text or images are lost into the center of the booklet when the pages are opened.

 

Wire Bound

Most popular for lots of different types of office based documents, wire binding can sometimes also be referred to as wire-o, wiro or wire comb binding.

How its done

Printed pages are stacked in order and the shuffled into place.

All of the pages are then hole punched down one side.

Finally, the open wire comb is threaded through the holes and clamped closed around the stack of paper – easy!

Perfect for

Wire binding is the most obvious choice for documents which require multiple use such as:

  • Notebooks
  • Calendars
  • Diaries

 

Why choose it?

The ‘o’ shaped binding allows the reader of the brochure to lay their book fully flat and even fold it completely in half – providing easy reference whilst taking up minimal space.

It is also the most durable binding option which allows for heavy use with virtually no wear and tear and can even allow for a page to be torn out without any effect on the surrounding pages.

Speaking of pages, brochures with wire-o binding can include an odd number of pages as each page is printed individually.

It is also easy to stay on brand and stand out with this stylish binding type as you can choose a wire colour to compliment your brochure’s colour scheme.

Things to remember

  1. Add a thicker cover for even more durability
    A thicker cover, around 250gsm or higher will make your brochure really sturdy and add even more durability.
  2. Works best with more than 20 pages
    Wiro binding works much better for brochures that have a substantial amount of pages, usually around 20 or more. However, you can certainly wire bind booklets with a smaller amount of pages if required.
  3. Allow 10mm of blank space from the spine
    All printed brochures require some blank space around the spine, but wire-o brochures require a little more than usual due to the thickness of the binding. Always allow around 10mm of blank space (safety zone) from the spine to avoid important text or images being covered with the binding.

 

Perfect Bound

Sometimes known as adhesive or softcover bound – perfect binding is the most sleek and stylish binding option.

How its done

Folded inner pages (signatures) are stacked on top of each other neatly and their spines are ruffed or notched.

Hot glue is then applied along the folds. The notching along the folds allows the glue to penetrate and absorb much easier, which means the binding will last longer.

The cover (both front and back) are printed on a single sheet with a 5mm spine in the middle. This is wrapped around all of the folded inner pages and the glued folded edges are pressed into the spine.

Perfect for

Perfect binding is most suited to professional publications, especially those with multiple issues or brochures with lots of content such as:

  • Magazines
  • Catalogues
  • Soft cover books

 

Why choose it?

Perfect bound brochures look very professional and luxurious which is why they are the most popular choice for most magazines.

The ability to include text on the spine is also a great feature for a publication such as a magazine or soft-cover books as it allows for easy reference when stacked and stored – making it easy to find a particular issue or title when scanning across the spines.

The way the binding is created also means that it can be used with a very high amount of pages, the spine size simply just increases in width as the number of pages increases.

Things to remember

  1. The page count must be in multiples of 4
    This is because the page spreads are printed on 1 sheet of paper which is folded in half – meaning each full printed page will have 4 individual pages.
  2. Page count must be around 40 pages or higher
    The inner pages have to provide enough surface area for the glue to bind the pages to cover spine area. A low number of pages cannot accommodate enough glue to hold the pages to the inner spine – so a higher page count will always work best.
  3. Allow a minimum of 5mm blank space from the spine
    As with all printed brochures, it is important that a minimum of 5mm of blank space is given when the spine will be. This blank space (safety area) will ensure that no important text or images are lost into the spine or the brochure when the pages are opened. If your brochure has a high amount of pages, allowing more blank space will be required.

 

This should give you everything you need to know to help choose the right binding for your next printed brochure. If you need are more help choosing, or would like a quote please feel free to call our team on 01952 850 730 or email us on sales@print-print.co.uk

Download this infographic.

Embed Our Infographic On Your Site!





Get a feel for what we do!

Our FREE sample packs are full of great print ideas. They’ll give you a taste of what to expect when ordering your design and printing from us.

Request free sample pack