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A good design brief is key to graphic design
25 Apr 2013
 

A good design brief is key to graphic design

 

A good design brief is key to graphic design

25 Apr 2013
give a good design brief

Get the design solution you want with a clear design brief
Whether you want to commission a graphic designer to create a logo, a website developer to build your website, or an artist to create a book cover, investing a little time and writing a clear brief will save you time and money in misunderstandings and revisions.

What is a design brief?
The brief is your instructions to the designer, comprising what you expect, and the deadline for delivery. You want to include details that will help the designer get a feel for your business, brand and ethos, without adding too much distracting information.

What should the brief include?

Open your design brief with a summary of your requirements, and include the following:

– Your company name

– Your business description, with core objectives, and how the brief relates to them.

– Describe your target audience.  How old are they? What is their preferred media channel, and how do you interact with them?

– Who are your main competitors? What do you like about their approach? How are you different?

– What image do you want to portray? Fun, young, professional?

– Does the design have a ‘most wanted response’ attached? If so, what is it? How will you know if it is successful?

– Include colours, design layouts and graphics that you like for the designer to use as a starting point, but leave enough creative space for them to impress you.

– Provide a work schedule. Set out when drafts and revisions are due, how you will agree changes to the brief, when payments will be made and when you will agree to pay extra.

How to write your brief.
Now you know what to include in your company brief, creating it becomes much easier. Start with the answers to the questions above in a table or note form. Give yourself as much time to create the brief as you would to write a tender.

– Clear your mind and your desk of distractions.

– Turn your notes into full sentences. Don’t worry about spelling, grammar or clarity at this point. Focus on ensuring you have included everything a designer might need to understand and fulfill your brief.

– Once you have a rough draft, look at each sentence and make sure it is easy to understand. Break chunks of information down into shorter sentences. Read it aloud. Try to find the simplest way of saying what you want without losing the important details.

– Get someone who understands the business and brief requirements to read through the brief, and take any comments on board. They’re meant to help your company get the most out of contractors, not to criticize you.

– Now have someone who isn’t an insider read through it and check for clarity and jargon. Implement any changes you need to make to ensure someone unfamiliar with your industry can understand the brief first time.

– Give it to a designer and talk it through with them, getting them to explain what they think you want after reading it. Clarify any changes in writing before you approve them to begin work on your brief.

In general the more information you can give to your designer then the more productive they will be and the quicker they can get to the design solution you require.
 





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give a good design brief

Get the design solution you want with a clear design brief
Whether you want to commission a graphic designer to create a logo, a website developer to build your website, or an artist to create a book cover, investing a little time and writing a clear brief will save you time and money in misunderstandings and revisions.

What is a design brief?
The brief is your instructions to the designer, comprising what you expect, and the deadline for delivery. You want to include details that will help the designer get a feel for your business, brand and ethos, without adding too much distracting information.

What should the brief include?

Open your design brief with a summary of your requirements, and include the following:

– Your company name

– Your business description, with core objectives, and how the brief relates to them.

– Describe your target audience.  How old are they? What is their preferred media channel, and how do you interact with them?

– Who are your main competitors? What do you like about their approach? How are you different?

– What image do you want to portray? Fun, young, professional?

– Does the design have a ‘most wanted response’ attached? If so, what is it? How will you know if it is successful?

– Include colours, design layouts and graphics that you like for the designer to use as a starting point, but leave enough creative space for them to impress you.

– Provide a work schedule. Set out when drafts and revisions are due, how you will agree changes to the brief, when payments will be made and when you will agree to pay extra.

How to write your brief.
Now you know what to include in your company brief, creating it becomes much easier. Start with the answers to the questions above in a table or note form. Give yourself as much time to create the brief as you would to write a tender.

– Clear your mind and your desk of distractions.

– Turn your notes into full sentences. Don’t worry about spelling, grammar or clarity at this point. Focus on ensuring you have included everything a designer might need to understand and fulfill your brief.

– Once you have a rough draft, look at each sentence and make sure it is easy to understand. Break chunks of information down into shorter sentences. Read it aloud. Try to find the simplest way of saying what you want without losing the important details.

– Get someone who understands the business and brief requirements to read through the brief, and take any comments on board. They’re meant to help your company get the most out of contractors, not to criticize you.

– Now have someone who isn’t an insider read through it and check for clarity and jargon. Implement any changes you need to make to ensure someone unfamiliar with your industry can understand the brief first time.

– Give it to a designer and talk it through with them, getting them to explain what they think you want after reading it. Clarify any changes in writing before you approve them to begin work on your brief.

In general the more information you can give to your designer then the more productive they will be and the quicker they can get to the design solution you require.
 





Get a feel for what we do!

Our FREE sample packs are full of great print ideas. They’ll give you a taste of what to expect when ordering your design and printing from us.

Request free sample pack