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UK Political Party Branding
12 May 2015
 

UK Political Party Branding

 

UK Political Party Branding

12 May 2015
main UK political party logos

Organisational branding is a key tool in letting people know who you are. It can identify the organisations position in the market, who they are targeting themselves at and the mission or founding principles. Logo, typeface, colour scheme, images and design layout are all important elements in the branding process. This even more so important when your audience is the whole nation and the power to run the country is at stake.

So what did the main six political parties say about themselves and how did this impact on their success, or lack of it, in the general election last week? Everyone, including the party leaders, have been surprised by the election outcome given what the exit poles hinted at.

Conservative Logo
Conservatives
The initial logo of the oak tree, scribbled with a fat marker pen that’s running out of ink and looked like a whale with a cold, was overlaid with the Union flag. This, presumably, was aimed at gaining supporters from the UKIP camp and certainly fitted better with the other elements of their branding. Their manifesto resembles the glossy corporate guide of a Fleet Street law firm and would look at home among the annual reports of investment banking firms.

If you think of Britain as a business and you want to restructure your management team then these guys bring you ‘serious’. Perhaps this hit home with the electorate. We need serious and we need it now.

Labour Logo
Labour
The party has used the anti-authority, socialist rose for 35 years although it’s currently less identifiably than previous versions. Its monochromatic design is resonated through the style of their manifesto like the budget line of a major supermarket. Apparently the party where demonstrating their intention to save money in areas of least impact when they choose to design the manifesto in-house.

This would certainly match their policies and principles but maybe the general flat, uninspiring style failed to inspire the electorate. Did the party say ‘creative, forward thinking’ or ‘market leading savvy’? Seems their branding was just not tough enough.

SNP Logo
Scottish National Party
A combination of the prickly Scottish national flower and the Saltire cross, the logo looks like someone dropped a charity ribbon. However, it clearly spoke volumes to the Scottish people, possibly better than using the national animal would have. A unicorn logo would be magical though.

The SNP’s manifesto design is lack-lustre and several poor quality images suggest this was far from a priority for the organisation. Hopefully the party will full fill its strap line rather than the soft, delicate party colour.

Lib Dem Logo
Liberal Democrats
The bird. The symbol of liberty. The simple, clean design is better executed than the scribbly tree or squished rose but the yellow lacks the punch of the blue or red. On paper, this might not hold its own and could easily be over powered by the stronger colours. The parties Manifesto uses the diamond shape from a previous interim logo design, which was likened to a road sign. It is littered with low-res images and dull graphics making it look like a design students initial draft.

They have used plenty of colour throughout which does lift the feel and they attempted to use current design trends so credit is due for their efforts.

UKIP Logo
United Kingdom Independent Party- UKIP
Not difficult to mistake the intention and their message is clear, keep the pound. The colours are to reflect their apparent appeal to supporters of all the other parties, the purple a mix of red and blue. It comes off brash and cheap but would certainly stand out in a line-up. Their parties’ general design intention is simple and non-corporate, a break from the main parties rhetoric but their manifesto is well thought through. It’s made effective use of current design trends with appropriate, high quality images.

A new logo might just be the making of the party, something that shouts for change. Maybe not one with we a pint though.

Green Party Logo
Green Party
The Earth as the centre of a sunflower, or on fire depending on the other parties green policies that make it through. It’s a strong logo, clean shape and simple idea, which is highly appropriate for the parties’ principles. The colour scheme also reflects their beliefs and works well in other situations, its fresh and optimistic.

Their manifesto resembles a university prospectus, possibly intentionally, its young an contemporary although more images would have made for more dynamic content. Perhaps this is to targeted to a niche group which in a general election is not going to help your cause.

Interested in re-branding? Here’s another article which will be of interest to you How colour defines your brand





Get a feel for what we do!

Our FREE sample packs are full of great print ideas. They’ll give you a taste of what to expect when ordering your design and printing from us.

Request free sample pack

 

main UK political party logos

Organisational branding is a key tool in letting people know who you are. It can identify the organisations position in the market, who they are targeting themselves at and the mission or founding principles. Logo, typeface, colour scheme, images and design layout are all important elements in the branding process. This even more so important when your audience is the whole nation and the power to run the country is at stake.

So what did the main six political parties say about themselves and how did this impact on their success, or lack of it, in the general election last week? Everyone, including the party leaders, have been surprised by the election outcome given what the exit poles hinted at.

Conservative Logo
Conservatives
The initial logo of the oak tree, scribbled with a fat marker pen that’s running out of ink and looked like a whale with a cold, was overlaid with the Union flag. This, presumably, was aimed at gaining supporters from the UKIP camp and certainly fitted better with the other elements of their branding. Their manifesto resembles the glossy corporate guide of a Fleet Street law firm and would look at home among the annual reports of investment banking firms.

If you think of Britain as a business and you want to restructure your management team then these guys bring you ‘serious’. Perhaps this hit home with the electorate. We need serious and we need it now.

Labour Logo
Labour
The party has used the anti-authority, socialist rose for 35 years although it’s currently less identifiably than previous versions. Its monochromatic design is resonated through the style of their manifesto like the budget line of a major supermarket. Apparently the party where demonstrating their intention to save money in areas of least impact when they choose to design the manifesto in-house.

This would certainly match their policies and principles but maybe the general flat, uninspiring style failed to inspire the electorate. Did the party say ‘creative, forward thinking’ or ‘market leading savvy’? Seems their branding was just not tough enough.

SNP Logo
Scottish National Party
A combination of the prickly Scottish national flower and the Saltire cross, the logo looks like someone dropped a charity ribbon. However, it clearly spoke volumes to the Scottish people, possibly better than using the national animal would have. A unicorn logo would be magical though.

The SNP’s manifesto design is lack-lustre and several poor quality images suggest this was far from a priority for the organisation. Hopefully the party will full fill its strap line rather than the soft, delicate party colour.

Lib Dem Logo
Liberal Democrats
The bird. The symbol of liberty. The simple, clean design is better executed than the scribbly tree or squished rose but the yellow lacks the punch of the blue or red. On paper, this might not hold its own and could easily be over powered by the stronger colours. The parties Manifesto uses the diamond shape from a previous interim logo design, which was likened to a road sign. It is littered with low-res images and dull graphics making it look like a design students initial draft.

They have used plenty of colour throughout which does lift the feel and they attempted to use current design trends so credit is due for their efforts.

UKIP Logo
United Kingdom Independent Party- UKIP
Not difficult to mistake the intention and their message is clear, keep the pound. The colours are to reflect their apparent appeal to supporters of all the other parties, the purple a mix of red and blue. It comes off brash and cheap but would certainly stand out in a line-up. Their parties’ general design intention is simple and non-corporate, a break from the main parties rhetoric but their manifesto is well thought through. It’s made effective use of current design trends with appropriate, high quality images.

A new logo might just be the making of the party, something that shouts for change. Maybe not one with we a pint though.

Green Party Logo
Green Party
The Earth as the centre of a sunflower, or on fire depending on the other parties green policies that make it through. It’s a strong logo, clean shape and simple idea, which is highly appropriate for the parties’ principles. The colour scheme also reflects their beliefs and works well in other situations, its fresh and optimistic.

Their manifesto resembles a university prospectus, possibly intentionally, its young an contemporary although more images would have made for more dynamic content. Perhaps this is to targeted to a niche group which in a general election is not going to help your cause.

Interested in re-branding? Here’s another article which will be of interest to you How colour defines your brand





Get a feel for what we do!

Our FREE sample packs are full of great print ideas. They’ll give you a taste of what to expect when ordering your design and printing from us.

Request free sample pack