FREE DELIVERY on everything

 

 FREE DELIVERY on everything

Print-Print
undefined

FREE UK Next Day Delivery

undefined

FREE Artwork File Check

undefined

White Label Packaging

trust-pilot-2 transp.png
 

  

QR Codes Are Back – only This Time....  It Matters
25 Aug 2020
 

QR Codes Are Back – only This Time.... It Matters

 

QR Codes Are Back – only This Time.... It Matters

25 Aug 2020
Qr-Codes-printed-outdoor-signage

There once was a time when it felt like the future was here.

You could point your pocket-computer at a poster or a flyer, and instantly buy a product or learn more about your target through a new piece of tech that had never been seen before.

That was the QR code. And almost as soon as it arrived, it was gone.

It wasn’t a problem with the technology itself. It was a problem of application. The QR code was ahead of its time, and no one really knew what to do with it

But today, QR codes are everywhere. And their staggering comeback is helping us stay safe in the fight against a global pandemic.

please-wait-to-be-seated-qr-codes

We’re becoming a contactless society

Between the masks, the hand sanitiser, and the constant safe radius between every person around us, we’re all doing everything we can to keep Covid-19 under control.

But it’s not just our hands and faces that are going contactless. Our devices are doing their part, too:

Back in April, during the height of the outbreak, Barclaycard reported that 90% of face-to-face transactions were made with contactless methods.

And that should come as no surprise. The bank had already seen a 23% increase in contactless payments last year – and the cashless demands of the current pandemic are putting more pressure on businesses and banks to find new ways to help curb the spread of the virus.

So how are small and large businesses adapting to the new normal?

They’re resurrecting the QR code. And they’re taking things far beyond the simple problem of contactless payment.

Luxury hospitality venues like The Ned and Soho House are delivering menus straight to their guests’ phones and tablets through a QR code they can scan at their table – eliminating the use of virus-friendly physical menus (and the continual need to disinfect them).

High-street giants like ASDA and John Lewis are cutting down on physical queues to their stores with a handy QR code scanned from a poster in their windows, so their shoppers can track their position in a virtual queue from the safety of their cars.

Medical practices are cutting down on phone calls, fashion stores are delivering a street-side shopping experience, and theme parks are certifying the health of their visitors before they enter – all with the use of printed QR codes.

The possibilities are endless.

But there’s one area in particular where QR codes are proving to be an invaluable ally – and that’s in helping us to follow Covid-19 as it travels through our communities.

We’re putting the virus on the map

In the UK, the NHS is throwing its full weight behind the Test and Trace initiative – collecting data about the movements and meetings of an entire population to help predict and prevent any further spread of the virus.

But the health service isn’t acting alone.

Businesses all over the country are pitching in to help, offering their own customer data to help pinpoint the path of infection. And the humble QR code has become an essential tool in the fight against the pandemic.

When McDonald’s reopened for eat-in services, they used QR codes at their tables so their customers could record their contact details and the time of their visit – so their data could be passed on in the case of another outbreak.

Marketing specialists like Sprout are offering brand-new apps to hospitality venues for free, giving their customers the ability to scan a QR code on their way in to a restaurant to provide the data health services need to alert those at risk.

As design and print suppliers have noticed a large surge in QR based print promotions. “Before the pandemic, we were seeing QR codes on less than 1% of our business orders,” said Dean Williams, Managing Director of online print company Print-Print. “Today, that number is closer to 40%. There’s no doubt that’s a consequence of Covid-19. But just like the move to remote working, companies are starting to see benefits beyond the current situation – and we could see QR codes becoming a staple part of the post-pandemic business world.”

And the UK government is already testing its own official QR Code Generator for businesses and venues that works in tandem with the Test and Trace app from the NHS. If that test is successful and it rolls out nationwide, you’ll soon be seeing QR codes on posters in your local community hubs and places of worship, too.

order-at-the-bar-qr-codes

But is it just a passing trend?

You’d be forgiven for thinking we’ve seen this all before. When QR codes were a fresh novelty, there was a buzz around a new and exciting futuristic piece of tech – which soon fizzled out when we couldn’t find a use for them.

But looking at data from around the globe, it looks like QR codes could be here to stay.

China has been using QR codes as a mainstream form of payment for years, long before the global pandemic forced our hands.

Spain has already announced its plans to move to a cashless society – a move that would likely create ongoing demand for contactless payment methods like QR codes.

And here in the UK, it’s not only high-street brands who are taking the plunge into using QR codes: we’re seeing a huge spike in SMEs bringing contactless technology into their businesses.

For me, on a personal level, if it means I don’t have to stand in a queue at the bar to order my food and drink, then that’s a bonus.





Get a feel for what we do!

Our FREE sample packs are full of great print ideas. They’ll give you a taste of what to expect when ordering your design and printing from us.

Request free sample pack

 

Qr-Codes-printed-outdoor-signage

There once was a time when it felt like the future was here.

You could point your pocket-computer at a poster or a flyer, and instantly buy a product or learn more about your target through a new piece of tech that had never been seen before.

That was the QR code. And almost as soon as it arrived, it was gone.

It wasn’t a problem with the technology itself. It was a problem of application. The QR code was ahead of its time, and no one really knew what to do with it

But today, QR codes are everywhere. And their staggering comeback is helping us stay safe in the fight against a global pandemic.

please-wait-to-be-seated-qr-codes

We’re becoming a contactless society

Between the masks, the hand sanitiser, and the constant safe radius between every person around us, we’re all doing everything we can to keep Covid-19 under control.

But it’s not just our hands and faces that are going contactless. Our devices are doing their part, too:

Back in April, during the height of the outbreak, Barclaycard reported that 90% of face-to-face transactions were made with contactless methods.

And that should come as no surprise. The bank had already seen a 23% increase in contactless payments last year – and the cashless demands of the current pandemic are putting more pressure on businesses and banks to find new ways to help curb the spread of the virus.

So how are small and large businesses adapting to the new normal?

They’re resurrecting the QR code. And they’re taking things far beyond the simple problem of contactless payment.

Luxury hospitality venues like The Ned and Soho House are delivering menus straight to their guests’ phones and tablets through a QR code they can scan at their table – eliminating the use of virus-friendly physical menus (and the continual need to disinfect them).

High-street giants like ASDA and John Lewis are cutting down on physical queues to their stores with a handy QR code scanned from a poster in their windows, so their shoppers can track their position in a virtual queue from the safety of their cars.

Medical practices are cutting down on phone calls, fashion stores are delivering a street-side shopping experience, and theme parks are certifying the health of their visitors before they enter – all with the use of printed QR codes.

The possibilities are endless.

But there’s one area in particular where QR codes are proving to be an invaluable ally – and that’s in helping us to follow Covid-19 as it travels through our communities.

We’re putting the virus on the map

In the UK, the NHS is throwing its full weight behind the Test and Trace initiative – collecting data about the movements and meetings of an entire population to help predict and prevent any further spread of the virus.

But the health service isn’t acting alone.

Businesses all over the country are pitching in to help, offering their own customer data to help pinpoint the path of infection. And the humble QR code has become an essential tool in the fight against the pandemic.

When McDonald’s reopened for eat-in services, they used QR codes at their tables so their customers could record their contact details and the time of their visit – so their data could be passed on in the case of another outbreak.

Marketing specialists like Sprout are offering brand-new apps to hospitality venues for free, giving their customers the ability to scan a QR code on their way in to a restaurant to provide the data health services need to alert those at risk.

As design and print suppliers have noticed a large surge in QR based print promotions. “Before the pandemic, we were seeing QR codes on less than 1% of our business orders,” said Dean Williams, Managing Director of online print company Print-Print. “Today, that number is closer to 40%. There’s no doubt that’s a consequence of Covid-19. But just like the move to remote working, companies are starting to see benefits beyond the current situation – and we could see QR codes becoming a staple part of the post-pandemic business world.”

And the UK government is already testing its own official QR Code Generator for businesses and venues that works in tandem with the Test and Trace app from the NHS. If that test is successful and it rolls out nationwide, you’ll soon be seeing QR codes on posters in your local community hubs and places of worship, too.

order-at-the-bar-qr-codes

But is it just a passing trend?

You’d be forgiven for thinking we’ve seen this all before. When QR codes were a fresh novelty, there was a buzz around a new and exciting futuristic piece of tech – which soon fizzled out when we couldn’t find a use for them.

But looking at data from around the globe, it looks like QR codes could be here to stay.

China has been using QR codes as a mainstream form of payment for years, long before the global pandemic forced our hands.

Spain has already announced its plans to move to a cashless society – a move that would likely create ongoing demand for contactless payment methods like QR codes.

And here in the UK, it’s not only high-street brands who are taking the plunge into using QR codes: we’re seeing a huge spike in SMEs bringing contactless technology into their businesses.

For me, on a personal level, if it means I don’t have to stand in a queue at the bar to order my food and drink, then that’s a bonus.





Get a feel for what we do!

Our FREE sample packs are full of great print ideas. They’ll give you a taste of what to expect when ordering your design and printing from us.

Request free sample pack